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Michael Eric Dyson to Share Insights on Truth and Race in America

Friday, January 17, 2020

Dominican University presents, in collaboration with Old St. Patrick's Church, esteemed public intellectual and prolific author Michael Eric Dyson on Tuesday, February 11. Dyson will discuss his book, "What Truth Sounds Like: RFK, James Baldwin, and Our Unfinished Conversation About Race in America," at 7 p.m. in the Performing Arts Center, 7900 W. Division Street.

"What Truth Sounds Like" was included in the Washington Post's 2018 list of notable works of nonfiction and received the 2018 Southern Book Prize. The book explores a 1963 meeting between U.S. Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy and black activists, including writer James Baldwin, which continues to impact society today. Individual chapters explore how black artists, activists and athletes, including Jay-Z, Beyoncé and Colin Kaepernick, bear witness to the black struggle today.

Dyson is one of the most perceptive scholars currently writing about race and politics. He is a contributing opinion writer for the New York Times and a contributing editor for the New Republic and ESPN's "The Undefeated" website. He also is a regular commentator on National Public Radio, MSNBC and CNN, and frequently appears on "Real Time with Bill Maher."

Named by Ebony Magazine as one of the 100 most influential black Americans in the country, Dyson is the author of 19 books, including his most recent, "Jay-Z: Made in America," and the American Book Award-winning "Come Hell or High Water: Hurricane Katrina and the Color of Disaster" (2007). He has also written "Tears We Cannot Stop: A Sermon to White America" (2017) and books about Barack Obama, Martin Luther King, Jr., Malcolm X, Tupac Shakur and Bill Cosby.

Dyson holds master's and doctoral degrees in religion from Princeton University and is an ordained Baptist minister. He is a professor of sociology at Georgetown University. ​

Tickets for this program are $10 and are available at https://events.dom.edu/dyson. For more information, contact the Siena Center at Dominican University at (708) 524-6607.